Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby Geoffrey » Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:25 pm

I would like to renew the flexible pipes in my system. I wonder if anyone has sourced suitable pipes that can come with a neat clamping system, to clamp the pipes to the brass piping.

Geoff
1947 Rover 12
1952 Sunbeam S8
Norton International Special
1947 Norton 16h plus Watsonian Monaco sidecar
1961 Royal Enfield Meteor Minor
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
1999 P38 Range Rover
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Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby GOY189 » Sat Mar 16, 2019 6:43 pm

Do you have the flexible pipes, even if they are grotty and beyond use, new flexible pipes can be crimped to the brass ends using new thimbles, try Stevson Motors in Birmingham. email stevsonmotors1@aol.com

Mike
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Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby Geoffrey » Sun Mar 17, 2019 9:23 pm

Thanks Mike. Yes the pipes are all there. Just rather grotty and oily. I will do as you suggest.

Regards Geoff
1947 Rover 12
1952 Sunbeam S8
Norton International Special
1947 Norton 16h plus Watsonian Monaco sidecar
1961 Royal Enfield Meteor Minor
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
1999 P38 Range Rover
Geoffrey
 
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Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2019 1:19 pm
Location: Tunbridge Wells area

Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby Geoffrey » Sat Mar 23, 2019 6:53 pm

An update on my attempts to get this system working. On removing the diaphragm pump I realised that the elbow connector that took the vacuum feed from the inlet manifold was actually one of the metering units that feeds oil to the chassis parts. This seemed quite wrong to me as it does not allow the free passage of air, being stuffed with wadding. I asked around a bit but no-one really seems to know how this system is supposed to work. I looked at the parts book and that shows some sort of filter device mounted in the vacuum line between manifold and pump. That is completely missing from my system. I sent off my diaphragm pump to Meadow Spares for refurbishment and within a few days it was back. I decided to drill out the 'metering unit' elbow connector so that air passes freely through it. Connected everything back up and started the engine. There is a sort of inspection plug you can remove in the oil line near the pump unit. I removed this and watched and waited. Nothing much seemed to happen and I was just about to give up when oil started to pump out! So I seem to have at least the beginnings of a working Luvax-Bijur lubrication system. I don't know how important the missing filter thingie is but the pump seems to be working.

I am still in two minds whether to just fit grease nipples. I get conflicting advice on this. The metering units use 3/8 connector but with quite a coarse thread about 18tpi I think. Not BSF. Does anyone know where suitable grease nipples may be sourced?
1947 Rover 12
1952 Sunbeam S8
Norton International Special
1947 Norton 16h plus Watsonian Monaco sidecar
1961 Royal Enfield Meteor Minor
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
1999 P38 Range Rover
Geoffrey
 
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Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2019 1:19 pm
Location: Tunbridge Wells area

Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby Phil - Nottingham » Sat Mar 23, 2019 11:28 pm

THe Luvax was disconnected and kaput on our 16 when we bought our P2 in 1996. I was not keen on restoring the system the but I was not happy using grease as the oil lube passages are really far too small to pass any thick grease at all to be effective. I have therefore used Castrol D (now SAE 140) in a high-pressure grease gun at least once a year. We have only done 11K miles but most bushes will easily outlast me on that basis
P2/P4/P5/P5B/LR's - EXJ 8**/2**8MY & others
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Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby luli » Sun Mar 24, 2019 9:04 pm

Here is the Rover service bulletin for the oiling system. Note that you can get new meter valves (3/8 BSF!) from the Fiennes company http://www.fiennes.co.uk/. It is very recommended to purchase the RSR workshop manual it is essential to maintain your car.
Revised: 1.8.47.
THE ROVER COMPANY LIMITED.
SERVICE BULLETIN.
3816
SUBJECT: LUVAX-BIJUR SYSTEM OF AUTOMATIC CHASSIS LUBRICATION

MODELS All 1935-47.


DESCRIPTION.

The Luvax system of automatic chassis lubrication is supplied as a standard fitting on all Rover models 1935-47.
The system operates continuously while the car is in use, feeding measured quantities of oil to the chassis bearings in accordance with their respective requirements.
The system is self-balanced so that whether driving conditions involve heavy traffic or a reverse condition, the correct amount of lubricant is always fed to the bearings. No attention is required by the owner of the car or by the Service Station except filling the oil reservoir when required, and replacing the vacuum regulator every 10,000 miles (except late 1946 and 1947 models).
The system is very simple in construction and comprises three major parts:-
1. The Lubricator Unit, consisting of an automatic pump and oil reservoir
mounted on the engine side of the dash.

2. A system of piping to distribute oil to the several bearings.

3. Meter Valves located at the bearings to meter a predetermined amount of oil to each bearing.

The pump comprises two sub-assemblies, the cylinder unit and piston unit. The former is provided with outlet and inlet ball valves. From the outlet valve a pipe leads to a connection mounted on the cover plate. Oil is admitted to the inlet valve in the bottom of the pump cylinder through a removable felt filter. The cylinder unit is bolted to a 'U' strap depending from the cover plate, and these parts are permanently secured together, forming a sub-assembly.
The second sub-assembly comprises a piston, the upper end of which is provided with a universal joint to connect it to the diaphragm shaft, which in turn is bolted to the underside of the diaphragm.

The diaphragm is urged downwards against a limiting stop by a spring, and the upper side is connected to the engine inlet manifold by piping. The manifold depression when the engine is running tands to draw the diaphragm upwards against the pressure of the spring and causes it to assume a position intermediate between the two extremes of its travel. Variations of manifold depression cause movements of the diaphragm, which cause pumping. The piston, therefore, rests in some position between the top and bottom of its stroke, corresponding to the manifold depression momentarily existing in the diaphragm chamber.

OIL RESERVOIR.

The lubricator is provided with a glass reservoir which permits inspection of oil level at a glance. The proper level of the oil is the top of the supporting bracket, a higher level will allow oil to splash or creep along the bottom of the cover. If by accident the bowl should be broken, it is necessary only to disconnect the pipe lines, remove the four holding down nuts, lift off the cover plate and drop a new bowl in place in the mounting bracket.

THE REGULATOR.

In ordinary driving there occurs an almost continuous change of manifold depression, due to throttle changes, so that the vacuum in the inlet manifold is a wave having its peaks and hollows a little above and below an average value. These waves occur rather slowly and the diaphragm ordinarily follows them closely. However, in conditions of heavy traffic, changes of vacuum occur more frequently and are of greater magnitude. In order to limit their action on the diaphragm and reduce their effect to approximately the same as that obtained under ordinary road conditions a regulator is introduced between the inlet manifold and the diaphragm. The regulator is a sealed unit and comprises a restriction formed by a pin fitted with a predetermined clearance into an accurate hole. The resistance of the regulator is chosen of the correct value for the car and cannot be altered in any way. Higher or lower resistances are available to raise or lower the output of the pump, but no change of resistance should be made unless there is a very definite reason for it.
Every 10,000 miles the regulator should be replaced by a new one, as it contains a filter that in the course of time may become choked.

NOTE: This does not apply to late 1946 and all 1947 models, as a large external filter is included in the suction lines. On these models neither the filter or regulator should need attentipn for approximately 100,000 miles.

METER VALVES.

The Meter Valves used are of the low pressure type, that is, they open at very low pressure and close at the least indication of return flow. The flow of oil through the valve is controlled by the clearance between a pin fitted to a hole. Six different sizes of pins give a range of flow rates to take care of the requirements of the various bearings supplied. Beyond the metering passage is a check valve which opens as soon as pressure is applied to the lines. As the lines are always full of oil, flow commences as soon as the pump starts to operate.

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING METER VALVES.

The Meter Valves and Vacuum regulator used in connection with the Chassis Lubrication system are chosen of the correct value for the work they have to do, and each one is clearly stamped with initial letters and rate number. It is very important, should it be necessary to remove a meter valve or regulator, that replacements be made as per the information given in the following table. The result of an error in replacing valves or regulators will mean that starvation (or a reverse condition) will occur at individual points when meter valves are concerned, or at all points where a regulator is concerned. Under all ordinary circumstances, it will never be necessary to change the rate value of a meter valves but if there are strong reasons to suspect that any individual point is not obtaining sufficient oil (or a reverse condition) it is permissible to change the valve in question for one having a larger or smaller rate value.
The following table gives the correct rate number and location of all the valves in the system.




LOCATION.
MODEL YEAR
H.P.
METER VALVE RATE.
Vacuum regulator
1935-47
10 & 12
TR 2
Vacuum regulator
1935-47
14,16 & 20
TR 1-1/2
Rear dumb iron.
1935-47
All
SE 2
Rear brake balance lever
1935-47
All
SSO
Rear spring, front end
1935-47
All
ST 1
Handbrake cross shaft U.S. end
1935-47
All
SE 0
Handbrake cross shaft O.S. end
1935-47
All
ST 0
Clutch cable
1937-47
All
S3 1.
Foot pedal spindle
1935-47
All
SE 1.
Front spring shackle
1935-38
All
ST 2
Front spring shackle
1939-47
All
ST 1
Fan and water pump
1935-47
All
SE 00
Front brake balance lever
1935-47
All (except 10 H.P. 1947)
SS 0
Front brake balance lever
1947
10
SE 0
Front dumb iron
1935- 47
All
SE 1
Drop arm
1935-47
10 & 12
SE 1
Drop arm
1935-38
14
SE 1
Drop arm
1937-38
16 & 20
SS 1
Drop arm
1939-46
14,16 &20
SS1.
Drop arm
1947
14 & 16
SE 1
Hand brake cams
1935
14
SS 00
Swivel pin
1935-36
All
SS 2
Swivel pin (top)
1947
All
SE 1
Swivel pin (bottom)
1947
10 & 12
SS 2
Swivel pin (bottom)
1947
14 & 16
SE 2
Track rod ball joint U.S.
1947
10 & 12
SE 1
Track rod ball joint N.S.
1947
14 & 16
SS 1
Track rod ball joint O.S.
1947
All
SE 1
Drag link ball joint
1947
10,14 &16
SS 1
Drag link ball joint
1947
12
SE 1

MAINTENANCE

Under all normal circumstances no attention is required except to see that the correct grade of oil is added to the reservoir when required. It is essential that a suitable lubricant be used or trouble may be experienced due to the fact that incorrect oil may congeal far more than dsired, giving rise to excessive back pressures, or may have other characteristics which may adversely affect the working of the system. The Rover Company have tested and recommend only the following oils to be used both Summer and Winters:-
Luvax Chassis Oil. Castrol ST. Mobiloil D Golden Shell Essolube Gear Oil (Medium) Notorine B, de-luxe

PIPE LINES.

If at any time it becomes necessary to remove from the chasis any of the major units, it will be found that one or more of the connections on the lubrication pipe lines will have to be broken. It is necessary to observe three rules whenever this is done:-

1. Plug the disconnected pipes with a wooden spigot to prevent oil escaping and dirt entering.
2. Make certain when re-connecting, that the joint is oil tight.
3. Re-prime the system with oil at the point provided.
4.
SERVICE CHECKS.

If at any time it is suspected that the unit is not functioning correctly, check as per the following information.

1. Inspect oil in reservoir and if there is any question as to its quality, replace with the correct grade. Should there be evidence of the use of incorrect oil, the reservoir should be thoroughly cleaned.
If the correct grade of oil is used it will lie unnecessary to clean the filter; but in the event of this having become coated with a deposit through the use of incorrect oil, it should be cleaned as follws:-

Disconnect the oil and air pipe lines.
Remove the four screws holding the cover plate and pump assembly to the mounting bracket, the assembly can then be withdrawn. By removing the spring ring and filter clamp ring, the filter can be readily taken out and washed in petrol. Re-assemble unit into reservoir and fill with correct grade of oil. Make sure that the air vent on top of the cover plate is clear.

2. Start the engine and allow it to run at a "tick-over". Disconnect the vacuum line at the vacuum regulator and the chassis line at the outlet point on the cover plate. By holding the vacuum tube tightly against the regulator, the piston should be drawn to the top of its stroke and should remain there so long as the tube is held and the engine revs are not altered. By removing the vacuum tube from the regulator the piston should return to the bottom of its stroke in five seconds or less and at the same time one or two drops of clear oil should be discharged at the outlet. If the piston does not move as described, the regulator should be changed for a new one. The action of the piston can be easily observed if the filler cap is removed. If the oil is standing low in the delivery pipe it may be necessary to repeat the process.

NOTE: In view of the fact that on 1946-47 models the vacuum regulator is fitted with a filter, it should not now need replacement. If, however, it is suspected that the filter is blocked, this can be ascertained by connecting the suction pipe line direct to the regulator and carrying out the above check again. If the fault is found to lie with the filter, this should be replaced.

3. In order to determine if a full piston stroke is being obtained, start the engine and allow it to run at a "tick-over". When the piston is at the top of its stroke there should be 1/4" of piston visible between the top of the brass cylinder and the bottom of the steel pump shaft. At the bottom of the
stroke it should not be possible to see the piston.

4. The vacuum regulator determines the rate of oil discharge from the pump.
Each regulator is marked with a symbol including rate number, such as TR 1-1/2 and TR 2. The resistance of the regulator is chosen of the correct value for the car. If the pump functions correctly as per the checks given, to increase its rate of discharge use a regulator of the next higher rate number, or to decrease discharge rate, use regulator of next lower rate number. However, no change of regulator should be made unless there is a very definite reason for increasing or decreasing the oil supply.

5. Make certain that the unions at either end of the vacuum tube and at either end of the rubber section of this tube, are tight and sound. If such is not the case there will probably be an audible "hissing" sound at the point of leakage and the pump would not answer to check No. 2, If the unit still does not function correctly after the above checks have been made it should be returned to the makers for examination and if necessary a new one substituted.

PRIMING.

On the three-way junction piece located on the dash on the off-side will be found a brass hexagon plug (on early models a nipple). To prime the system remove this plug and fit a suitable oil nipple and with an oil gun pump the pipe lines full of one of the recommended grades of oil. This procedure can also be followed in the event of the pump being out of action for any reason.

VACUUM REGULATOR.

As stated previously, this should be changed at least every 10,000 miles on 1935-early 1946 models. In order to do this, disconnect the air line at the vacuum regulator, unscrew the old regulator and screw a new one of the same value in its place. A little jointing compound should be smeared on the threads before fitting. Do not reconnect the air line until the new regulator has been checked for correct working as in Service Check No. 2. above.

COMPLAINTS.

As previously stated, the Meter Valves and Vacuum Regulator used in connection with the chassis lubrication system are chosen of a correct value for the work they have to do, and each one is clearly stamped with initial letters and rate number.

VALVE SIZES MUST NOT ES ALTERED.

The original sizes have now been proven satisfactory, therefore, if any excess or starvation occurs, the trouble may be due to a defective metering valve or regulator but NOT to an incorrect size providing it is in accordance with the chart.
By deviating from the Chart sizes at any point you may be creating trouble for yourself.

COMPLAINT 1.

Excessive oil consumption of lubrication unit (less than 1,000 miles per pint) Check the size of the existing regulator (see Table). If it is incorrect replace with one of the correct size. If the correct size is already fitted, replace with a new one of the same size. At the same time check for loose connections or a broken pipe; if such is present, there will be no signs of an oil leakage. Replace or tighten as necessary.

COMPLAINT 2.

Excessive lubrication at any individual point in the system. Check the size of the valve concerned, if incorrect fit a new one of the correct size, if correct, fit a new one of the same size.
NOTE: Signs of oil will always be apparent at every lubrication point, but this must not be taken as a sign of over lubrication unless it is sufficient to become objectionable. If such were the case, the cause would most probably be as in Complaint 1 or in the following:-

COMPLAINT 3.

Excessive signs of oil at all lubrication points.
Check as in Complaint 1 and in addition check grade of oil in use (see chart). If grade is too thin this trouble would be expected.

COMPLAINT 4.

Starvation at one point in the system. This will be indicated by the fact that no signs of oil will be found around the affected valve, and if the complaint is of sufficiently long standing, squeaks may develop through lack of lubrication. Disconnect pipe line at the point affected and prime the system, checking to see if oil comes out of the pipe line. If so, the fault lies in the passages within the unit and these must be cleared. If not, the pipe line must be disconnected at the next junction piece. Work backwards through the system until the blockage is discovered. An air line or foot pump should be used to clear the pipe line. If the meter valve is found to be blocked, this should be replaced.

COMPLAINT 5.

Starvation at all points. This will be indicated by the fact that the oil level in the reservoir will remain constant and later squeaks may develop and signs of dryness at all points.
1, Check the working of the pump unit as in Service Check No. 2. If this is unsatisfactory, carry out Service Check Nos. 1,3,4, and 5. If there appears to be insufficient vacuum to operate the pump unit, remove the adapter from the inlet manifold and see that it is clear.
2. Check that the first junction on the scuttle is not blocked.

COMPLAINT 6.

Partial starvation, i.e. at one group of valves in the System only. This can only be due to a choked or broken oil pipe or junction piece. Disconnect the pipes at all the affected valves and at the corresponding pipes on the three-way junction on the dash and apply air pressure to clear the line.- Examine the line from the three-way junction on the dash to the affected valves for damaged or misplaced pipes.
Rover 10 1946 RHD
Rover 10 1947 LHD
Rover 12 1947 tourer LHD
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Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby Geoffrey » Sun Mar 24, 2019 9:25 pm

Thank you for the service bulletin. That is very useful. I need to try and source a vacuum regulator as mine is missing. I simply have a line going straight from the inlet manifold to the pump
1947 Rover 12
1952 Sunbeam S8
Norton International Special
1947 Norton 16h plus Watsonian Monaco sidecar
1961 Royal Enfield Meteor Minor
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
1999 P38 Range Rover
Geoffrey
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2019 1:19 pm
Location: Tunbridge Wells area

Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby RichardGHB » Thu May 16, 2019 3:19 pm

I dont think that a vacuum regulator is particularly important, I have recently cleaned out a spare Bijur pump and connected a pressure gauge to the oil outlet. By applying a vacuum to the diaphragm the pressure rapidly built up to over 12 bar, the limit of my gauge. The thread is 3/8 BSF but the system is still in use for lubricating madhine tools and new meter valves are still available and although of slightly fifferent design, the ratings of the valves are still the same. Bijur is the name of the system; Luvax was the company making the parts in the UK under licence.
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Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby MarkK » Sat May 18, 2019 7:57 am

I'm currently renewing the whole system. David Mosely advertises in Freewheel and is going to manufacture the new conduits. He will need your old brass finials and can offer replacements in brass or stainless steel.
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Re: Luvax-Bijur lubrication system

Postby Geoffrey » Sat May 18, 2019 9:27 am

I have replaced my badly corroded and leaking flexible pipes. The oil level in the reservoir is going down slowly as I drive, so hopefully oil is reaching the bits it should!
1947 Rover 12
1952 Sunbeam S8
Norton International Special
1947 Norton 16h plus Watsonian Monaco sidecar
1961 Royal Enfield Meteor Minor
2018 Royal Enfield Himalayan
1999 P38 Range Rover
Geoffrey
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2019 1:19 pm
Location: Tunbridge Wells area


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